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Wednesday, December 15, 2010

Lasik Monovision: Fake Beleif part 6

Crazy Cures
26. An apprentice of the traditional Bosson religion uses her healing powers to cure a young child during the Ahouwe ritual purification dance in Aniassue on the eastern Ivory Coast July 15, 2007. Ahouwe is a ritual dance in Ivory Coast's eastern Akan area and in Ghana, during which followers become possessed by genies who instruct them on the preparation of natural cures. The women who practice the Bosson religion are known as Komians, spiritual mediums who claim to possess healing powers. REUTERS/ Luc Gnago
Crazy Cures
27. Cambodia villagers collect the urine of a cow believed to have healing powers in Kompot province, about 100 km (62 miles) south of the Cambodian capital Phnom Penh, on September 26, 2002. Belief in the supernatural healing powers of animals such as cows, snakes and turtles is relatively common in Cambodia, where more than third of the population lives on less than $1 a day and few can afford modern medicines. REUTERS/Chor Sokunthea
Crazy Cures
28. Russian woman takes leech treatment in a laboratory in Moscow, February 1, 2001. The International Leech Centre raises leeches for use in treatments dating from ancient Egypt for a wide variety of ailments, including blood disorders and immunity problems. AS/FMS
Crazy Cures
29. An asthma patient swallows a life fish as part of his treatment in Bombay June 8. The tiny river fish's mouth is stuffed with herbal medicine before it is forced live down the throat of asthmatics in a ritual that some Indians believe provides a sure shot cure for the disease. The combination of herbs used in the procedure is a secret that is tightly guarded by an Indian family which claims to have known it for 150 years. SK/DL/CLH/
Crazy Cures
30. Kazuhiro Aoki, puts his face in an aquarium as Garra rufa, a fish used for skin treatment, nibbles his skin at the Beautyworld Japan trade fair in Tokyo May 20, 2008. Over 600 exhibitors took part in Japan's largest beauty trade fair which ends May 21. REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao
Crazy Cures
31. A man is made to swallow a live fish as a form of medicine during a camp in the southern Indian city of Hyderabad June 8, 2008. Every year in June, the Bathini Goud brothers from Hyderabad draw thousands to their camp to take part in the administering of the fish medicine, which they believe cures them of asthma and respiratory problems. REUTERS/Krishnendu Halder
Crazy Cures
32. A resident receives horn cupping treatment on his back on a street in Nanning, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region July 13 2008. Cupping is an alternative form of pain therapy that has been part of Chinese medicine for over 2,500 years, local media reported. REUTERS/Stringer
Crazy Cures
33. Nine-year-old Muhammad Ponari (L), a boy whom locals believe possesses healing powers, dips his magic stone into a bottle of water, during a mass healing event in Jombang, East Java province February 11, 2009. About two months ago, Ponari caught a stone which fell from the sky, shortly after lightning struck the area he was playing in, according to Ponari's uncle, Mulyono. Believing that this stone contained magical healing powers, thousands have sought Ponari's help by drinking water which he dips the stone in. Picture taken February 11, 2009. REUTERS/Sigit Pamungkas
Crazy Cures
34. Students perform Rubber Neti, an ancient yogic technique, in the northern Indian city of Chandigarh May 21, 2009. Many Indians believe that Rubber Neti controls the common cold, cough and asthma and keeps the nasal passages clean. REUTERS/Ajay Verma

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